Tuesday, 7 April 2015

Easy paper flowers


We're festooned with  flowers at the moment…mostly cheery, bright cardboard and paper ones. It all started with egg box roses, daffs and snowdrops a few weeks ago, and now there are paper daisies sprinkled around the kitchen like flower confetti! 

They are really easy to make and useful for other projects too.

You will need:
Coloured paper or plain paper to paint
General purpose scissors

For the other projects:
Small scissors (like nail scissors)
Ball of plasticine or modelling clay
Pipe cleaner
White card
Paint
Buttons
Ribbon, braid, string
PVA craft glue

1.  Find things to draw around in the kitchen, like tins, jars or side plates.



2.  It's best to start with a big circle first, to get some practice. Draw around your shape and cut it out.



3  Fold the circle in half, then in quarters and then eighths.



4.  About 1cm (1/2") up from the tip, draw a line straight across and mark it in the middle.

5.  Draw a petal shape from this mark to a top corner and repeat on the other side, making sure the petals look alike.



6.  Then, cut carefully along the pencil lines, making sure the tip of both petals stays pointy - and open up your flower.




7.  When you've made a few and feel more confident, try some smaller circles, so you can build up  flowers with a few petal layers.



8.  If you'd like to make a daisy to add to a spring flower posy, put one of your cut-outs on a ball of plasticine and push the closed tip of the small scissors through the middle of the paper. Don't make the hole too big.

9.  Push a pipe cleaner up through the hole and bend the top 3cm (1") over at a right-angle - then carefully spiral the bendy wire around itself, to make the centre of you flower. Push the paper back up under the pipe cleaner centre.





Making some flower bunting or a daisy chain is another fun thing to do with your cut-out flowers.

10. Find a longish piece ribbon or something similar, and cut to the length you want for your bunting. We used quite thin sequin braid, with a bit of sparkle, but to be honest thicker is better for stable bunting that doesn't swing about too much. 

11. Chose three different sized circles - for the outer petals, inner petals and the centre. 




12. A bottle lid makes a good centre circle template - we went for yellow middles, but pick whatever colour you like. Cut out flowers from the other bigger circles, and make enough of each to space out along your ribbon (roughly 20cm (8") between our flowers). 

13. Glue the centres in the middle of the inner petals, then brush a good amount of glue all over the middle section of the biggest flower and lay the ribbon over it, a little above the halfway point, to stop it flipping over when it's hanging up.

14. Next, dab a bit more glue on the back of the inner petals and stick them down over the ribbon and position so the petals are between the ones below.



15. Repeat along your ribbon - use a ruler or tape measure to space them evenly - then leave to dry.



16. To make a daisy chain, cut out white flowers with yellow centres and glue them straight onto the ribbon. The small yellow centres can be more fiddly to cut, so, if you want just paint them on instead.



17. Smaller flowers make lovely card decorations too. My daughter made these - some with painted centres and some with buttons, which works really well. The vase is cut out from an old birthday card.



I've had a little primrose idea….

4 comments:

  1. Superb ideas Tracey, I'm loving the daisy bunting and I've got a punch for those awkward centres...don't be giving me any more ideas please, the house needs a spring clean first.

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  2. Just done a spot of that and now have a mountain of car boot stuff…where does it all come from??! Great you've got a punch for the centres, definitely speed things up.

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  3. So bright and cheerful. This is quite nostalgic for me too - my Dad used to make paper flowers for me when I was little.

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  4. Very pretty and very effective! :)

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